Gathering
mostly findings and notions with the occasional thing made by me. For more of things I create, see the links above. For tumblr feed of just my work see erincurryart.tumblr.com

Pablo Neruda, from “Still Another Day: XVII/Men”

(via litverve)

“We all arrive by different streets,
by unequal languages, at Silence.”
Notes

rabbitglitter:

rabbitglitter:

I just wrote out my template for this term’s classes informing my professors that the name they see on their roster is not the name I go by.

I’m sharing it here in case you need some help wording yours. Just add your own information where the blanks…

Signal boost

Also as a teacher:

Something I’m implementing this semester is passing out index cards and asking all my students to sketch a self-portrait, and then on the back write their registered name, their name, and preferred pronouns. I’ll call roll with the cards and sort my log after class.

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/meter reader/ found abstract comic 9.4.2012

/meter reader/ found abstract comic 9.4.2012

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sequentialartistsworkshop:

Found Abstract Comics, by Erin Curry at http://sculptressgathers.tumblr.com/

Tom posted these awhile back, they aren’t really up here yet. More here: http://erincurry.com/found-abstract-comics/

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inkanddestroy:

altcomix:

Altcomix Comic Challenge Round 1
This is a comic experiment.  If this is successful, we’ll do more, and if it’s not, probably we won’t.  For the first round, the script has been donated to us by bobschofield.  Just draw this as a page of comics.  You can use text, or not.  Up to you how you want to communicate it.  If you have any questions, ask them and I’ll amend this post with answers.
“It is nighttime. There are trees.Trees filled with eyes, and dying men.A kind of bird, hiding its face behind white gloves.Something falls from a great height.And puts a smile on the moon.”

I want to try to do this.

all right.

inkanddestroy:

altcomix:

Altcomix Comic Challenge Round 1

This is a comic experiment.  If this is successful, we’ll do more, and if it’s not, probably we won’t.  For the first round, the script has been donated to us by bobschofield.  Just draw this as a page of comics.  You can use text, or not.  Up to you how you want to communicate it.  If you have any questions, ask them and I’ll amend this post with answers.

“It is nighttime. There are trees.
Trees filled with eyes, and dying men.
A kind of bird, hiding its face behind white gloves.
Something falls from a great height.
And puts a smile on the moon.”

I want to try to do this.

all right.

Notes
mmsmedialab said: How do you think that educators can't encourage the "Steal Like An Artist" thinking when the "copying" has been so maligned. Kids seem to hate it when I suggest that we study an artist and try to duplicate his/her style and technique. Interestingly though, they love to trace stuff and create derivative YouTube vlogs. Any ideas on mashing this together to help kids make sense of this?

austinkleon:

You might check out Kenny Goldsmith’s Uncreative Writing

Here he is talking about it:

“For the past several years, I’ve taught a class at the University of Pennsylvania called “Uncreative Writing.” In it, students are penalized for showing any shred of originality and creativity. Instead they are rewarded for plagiarism, identity theft, repurposing papers, patchwriting, sampling, plundering, and stealing. Not surprisingly, they thrive. Suddenly what they’ve surreptitiously become expert at is brought out into the open and explored in a safe environment, reframed in terms of responsibility instead of recklessness.

We retype documents and transcribe audio clips. We make small changes to Wikipedia pages (changing an “a” to “an” or inserting an extra space between words). We hold classes in chat rooms, and entire semesters are spent exclusively in Second Life. Each semester, for their final paper, I have them purchase a term paper from an online paper mill and sign their name to it, surely the most forbidden action in all of academia. Students then must get up and present the paper to the class as if they wrote it themselves, defending it from attacks by the other students. What paper did they choose? Is it possible to defend something you didn’t write? Something, perhaps, you don’t agree with? Convince us.

All this, of course, is technology-driven. When the students arrive in class, they are told that they must have their laptops open and connected. And so we have a glimpse into the future. And after seeing what the spectacular results of this are, how completely engaged and democratic the classroom is, I am more convinced that I can never go back to a traditional classroom pedagogy. I learn more from the students than they can ever learn from me. The role of the professor now is part party host, part traffic cop, full-time enabler.

The secret: the suppression of self-expression is impossible. Even when we do something as seemingly “uncreative” as retyping a few pages, we express ourselves in a variety of ways. The act of choosing and reframing tells us as much about ourselves as our story about our mother’s cancer operation. It’s just that we’ve never been taught to value such choices.

After a semester of my forcibly suppressing a student’s “creativity” by making her plagiarize and transcribe, she will tell me how disappointed she was because, in fact, what we had accomplished was not uncreative at all; by not being “creative,” she had produced the most creative body of work in her life. By taking an opposite approach to creativity—the most trite, overused, and ill-defined concept in a writer’s training—she had emerged renewed and rejuvenated, on fire and in love again with writing.”

(Emphasis mine.)

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Rudolf PolanszkyReconstructions - 2012, Relief Painting, iron, wood, plastic on canvas, 184 x 200 cm

Rudolf Polanszky
Reconstructions - 2012, Relief Painting, iron, wood, plastic on canvas, 184 x 200 cm

Notes
other-wordly:

pronunciation | mO-nO nO a-wa-rAJapanese script | 物の哀れ

other-wordly:

pronunciation | mO-nO nO a-wa-rA
Japanese script | 物の哀れ

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myampgoesto11:

Tokujin Yoshioka's 'Crystallized Project': 6 Months of Tonal Vibrations of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake Expressed in Crystal  

“Nature shows us a beauty that exceeds our imagination,” says Tokujin Yoshioka. “The forms of nature are unique and cannot be reproduced. This endows them with mysterious beauty and makes them fascinating to us”.

As part of the Japanese designer’s large-scale one-man show at MOT in Tokyo, Yoshioka has installed a peculiar work he calls “a painting.” Looking much more like a bed of water than a painting, the piece is actually 6-months’ worth of crystal that have been growing, layer by layer, inside a glass tank. It’s truly a work of art that has been ceded to the hand of mother nature.

But the crystals haven’t just been sitting there quietly. Throughout the whole time they’ve been exposed to the music from Tchaikovsky’s ballet, Swan Lake. The tonal vibrations and pulsations materialize within the crystal, dictating its final form.

According to Phenom World, a Netherlands based manufacturer of electron microscopes and other high-tech imaging tools, “crystals exposed to music showed differences in size, form and structure of the surface. But what exactly about different frequencies and rhythm vibrations causes the change still remains a mystery.

“I believe that a design is not something that is completed through being given a form, but rather something that is completed by the human heart. I also feel that incorporating the principles and movements of nature into ideas will become something important in future design.”

text source: Spoon & Tamago

images: Tokujin Yoshioka, Phenom World, Revista Código

Notes
the-drawing-center:

“He’s not using language to tell a story—the language itself is the story.”
This is how Susan Bernofsky, translator of Robert Walser’s microscripts which are now on view at The Drawing Center, explains his work. Check  out interviews with  Bernofsky in The Nation and for the The Center for the Art of Translation, or read more excerpts below:
“Looking at the manuscripts, and the facsimiles in this book, is really special because by seeing how obsessed Walser is with the physical texture of writing, you come to understand something more about the stories. Even in his correspondence he’ll write a perfect block of text, such that he’ll make sure that the last line completes the square. He’s not going to end the line in the middle of a line—he’ll go all the way to the end. You can see he’s conscious of the text as an object, and literally how it’s framed. There was a letter to his sister I found in the archive, and he signs off on the letter and then he writes, “Greetings to so-and-so”—and I’m sure he only wrote “Greetings to so and so”—to fill out the line.”
“It took two devoted scholars twelve years to transcribe the six volumes of these texts. That’s two years per volume! In the late ’80s I watched them at work, peering through tiny magnifying lenses and discussing each word at length. These published transcriptions are what I based the translations on. I think of Walser’s miniature writing as a sort of shorthand he developed for his rough drafts, and he wrote like this for many years. There’s been a lot of speculation about why and when he developed this technique. The writing is an enormously reduced Kurrent script—that’s an old form of German handwriting people stopped using around WWII.”
To see Walser’s microscripts in person, check out Dickinson/Walser: Pencil Sketches at The Drawing Center! His work is being shown in conjunction with Emily Dickinson’s manuscripts.

the-drawing-center:

He’s not using language to tell a story—the language itself is the story.”

This is how Susan Bernofsky, translator of Robert Walser’s microscripts which are now on view at The Drawing Center, explains his work. Check  out interviews with  Bernofsky in The Nation and for the The Center for the Art of Translation, or read more excerpts below:

Looking at the manuscripts, and the facsimiles in this book, is really special because by seeing how obsessed Walser is with the physical texture of writing, you come to understand something more about the stories. Even in his correspondence he’ll write a perfect block of text, such that he’ll make sure that the last line completes the square. He’s not going to end the line in the middle of a line—he’ll go all the way to the end. You can see he’s conscious of the text as an object, and literally how it’s framed. There was a letter to his sister I found in the archive, and he signs off on the letter and then he writes, “Greetings to so-and-so”—and I’m sure he only wrote “Greetings to so and so”—to fill out the line.

It took two devoted scholars twelve years to transcribe the six volumes of these texts. That’s two years per volume! In the late ’80s I watched them at work, peering through tiny magnifying lenses and discussing each word at length. These published transcriptions are what I based the translations on. I think of Walser’s miniature writing as a sort of shorthand he developed for his rough drafts, and he wrote like this for many years. There’s been a lot of speculation about why and when he developed this technique. The writing is an enormously reduced Kurrent script—that’s an old form of German handwriting people stopped using around WWII.

To see Walser’s microscripts in person, check out Dickinson/Walser: Pencil Sketches at The Drawing Center! His work is being shown in conjunction with Emily Dickinson’s manuscripts.

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S