theklicker:

Some things are harder than others. Detail. #minimaliststainpaintings

Oliver’s at it again with the collecting.

theklicker:

Some things are harder than others. Detail. #minimaliststainpaintings

Oliver’s at it again with the collecting.

(via inliminalspace)

necroferret:

G*nder as an Abstract Concept is a zine which is basically exactly what it says on the tin. it’s about exploring gender as an abstract spectrum, completely outside binaries and boundaries.
i’m currently looking for submissions and pieces to compile and publish in this zine. pieces can be anything from lengthy essays about your gender identity, to heavy allegorical poems, to pictures of anime characters with “my gender” written on them. as long as your piece fits in the category of the title, it can be absolutely anything. fiction, non-fiction, poetry, comics, memes. 
rules for submission:
submitter can’t be cis (this zine and its exploration of gender is a safe space for trans people only, sorry. you can still read it though)
no nudity/porn of a visual nature (if it’s written then i can put a content warning at the start, but i can’t do that with pictures)
no excessive visual gore (for the same reason as above) (minor stuff is okay)
if an image wasn’t created by you, you must provide a source (either as a link when you submit it or in the bottom corner or something)
you can submit by: physically submitting it to my inbox, putting it in the #necroferret or #gender as an abstract concept tags, or emailing it to me at rustyhijinks@outlook.com
once again, and i stress this, your submission can be absolutely anything 

necroferret:

G*nder as an Abstract Concept is a zine which is basically exactly what it says on the tin. it’s about exploring gender as an abstract spectrum, completely outside binaries and boundaries.

i’m currently looking for submissions and pieces to compile and publish in this zine. pieces can be anything from lengthy essays about your gender identity, to heavy allegorical poems, to pictures of anime characters with “my gender” written on them. as long as your piece fits in the category of the title, it can be absolutely anything. fiction, non-fiction, poetry, comics, memes. 

rules for submission:

  • submitter can’t be cis (this zine and its exploration of gender is a safe space for trans people only, sorry. you can still read it though)
  • no nudity/porn of a visual nature (if it’s written then i can put a content warning at the start, but i can’t do that with pictures)
  • no excessive visual gore (for the same reason as above) (minor stuff is okay)
  • if an image wasn’t created by you, you must provide a source (either as a link when you submit it or in the bottom corner or something)

you can submit by: physically submitting it to my inbox, putting it in the #necroferret or #gender as an abstract concept tags, or emailing it to me at rustyhijinks@outlook.com

once again, and i stress this, your submission can be absolutely anything 

(via laurellynnleake)

Tags: signal boost

"Oh abstractions are just abstract until they have an ache in them."

— Stephen Dunn (via likeafieldmouse)

(Source: violentwavesofemotion, via an-itinerant-poet)

Tags: quote

weissesrauschen:

Kai Mailänder

Saw in Berlin. Was accompanied by a child-sized house and evergreen trees. 

weissesrauschen:

Kai Mailänder

Saw in Berlin. Was accompanied by a child-sized house and evergreen trees. 

(Source: ssonne91, via inliminalspace)

aureliomadrid:

water bear (tardigrade)

aureliomadrid:

water bear (tardigrade)

(Source: mizisham)

Tags: cute therapy

The sculptures of Swedish artist Nina Canell (b. 1979) give substance to the intangible and lightness to the physical. Drawn to the subtlety of fluctuating forces and the minutiae of perception, Canell traces the innate bond we have with our surrounding atmosphere.

The sculptures of Swedish artist Nina Canell (b. 1979) give substance to the intangible and lightness to the physical. Drawn to the subtlety of fluctuating forces and the minutiae of perception, Canell traces the innate bond we have with our surrounding atmosphere.

(Source: krillsjuill, via artspotting)

"Entitled ‘Evian’, the exhibition will continue to demonstrate Jensen’s practice of incorporating diverse material elements into his pictures and utilise an unconventional and contrary application of acrylic paint. Mostly small in scale with a subdued palette, the paintings employ methods of layering, charring, staining and adhering to create arrestingly minimal compositions. Jensen recycles materials within his work, using the stains, tears and traces of use on linen, burlap, silk and wool as compositional readymades for his own pictures. In this way, he has been ‘systematically removing the conventions of painting from his work, removing even gesture and paint itself’ (1).
Jensen’s work is abstract to the point of negation. Using the principles of the readymade, he draws attention to the incidental details of his materials, transforming leftovers from past projects into new works as a gesture of self-reflexivity. In ‘Grey Plastic Scar’ (2013) torn pieces of material are carefully sewn and then painted over, so that they appear like past scars under skin whose dynamic verticals create their own linear composition. Patch-worked money bags, suggestive of a symbiotic relationship between art and money, are used as a ground for ‘Money Bags’ (2013) and a series of black monochrome works are made by charring the outline of an abstract shape directly onto the canvas in ‘Brown Diamond’ (2013). While these latter works adhere to the idea of painting without paint, the texture and pigment of their charred crust mimics the tactility of paint itself. In ‘Untitled’ (2013) Jensen has dyed an American quilt an inky Prussian blue, while allowing the other colours of the found textile to emerge as burgundy fan shapes that appear to float on the work’s surface.
Veering between a kind of abstract nihilism on the one hand, and the merest hint of representation on the other, Jensen’s pictures remain unsentimental and impassive. In one work entitled ‘Teracotta Scar’ (2013), for example, which employs a neutral beige ground, tiny patches of embroidery are built up into protean shapes, which while purely abstract, are reminiscent of insects or other natural forms moving across the canvas surface. When viewed from a distance, they could equally take on the anthropomorphic qualities of a human face. In ‘Incense’ (2013), which appears to deftly combine the purposeful with the accidental, delicate traces of ash burnt by incense sticks form repetitive lines that emerge from the bottom of a canvas. Their linear pattern extends from the wooden frame, the singed markings evidence of where the sticks initially rested.
In ‘Acrylic Painting III (dancing figures)’(2013), a willfully thick use of acrylic medium creates two ghostly outlines, and the virtually translucent impasto blurs the figures in motion. Although Jensen draws from artists like the French Romantic 19th Century painter Théodore Chassériau or other classical masters, Peter Eleey notes in his essay ‘Regression Tourism’, Jensen ‘gives shape to a reconsideration of modernism’s utopias, now tempered by failure and corrupted by tragedy; he reminds us that those myths survive only as style.’ (2)”

"Entitled ‘Evian’, the exhibition will continue to demonstrate Jensen’s practice of incorporating diverse material elements into his pictures and utilise an unconventional and contrary application of acrylic paint. Mostly small in scale with a subdued palette, the paintings employ methods of layering, charring, staining and adhering to create arrestingly minimal compositions. Jensen recycles materials within his work, using the stains, tears and traces of use on linen, burlap, silk and wool as compositional readymades for his own pictures. In this way, he has been ‘systematically removing the conventions of painting from his work, removing even gesture and paint itself’ (1).

Jensen’s work is abstract to the point of negation. Using the principles of the readymade, he draws attention to the incidental details of his materials, transforming leftovers from past projects into new works as a gesture of self-reflexivity. In ‘Grey Plastic Scar’ (2013) torn pieces of material are carefully sewn and then painted over, so that they appear like past scars under skin whose dynamic verticals create their own linear composition. Patch-worked money bags, suggestive of a symbiotic relationship between art and money, are used as a ground for ‘Money Bags’ (2013) and a series of black monochrome works are made by charring the outline of an abstract shape directly onto the canvas in ‘Brown Diamond’ (2013). While these latter works adhere to the idea of painting without paint, the texture and pigment of their charred crust mimics the tactility of paint itself. In ‘Untitled’ (2013) Jensen has dyed an American quilt an inky Prussian blue, while allowing the other colours of the found textile to emerge as burgundy fan shapes that appear to float on the work’s surface.

Veering between a kind of abstract nihilism on the one hand, and the merest hint of representation on the other, Jensen’s pictures remain unsentimental and impassive. In one work entitled ‘Teracotta Scar’ (2013), for example, which employs a neutral beige ground, tiny patches of embroidery are built up into protean shapes, which while purely abstract, are reminiscent of insects or other natural forms moving across the canvas surface. When viewed from a distance, they could equally take on the anthropomorphic qualities of a human face. In ‘Incense’ (2013), which appears to deftly combine the purposeful with the accidental, delicate traces of ash burnt by incense sticks form repetitive lines that emerge from the bottom of a canvas. Their linear pattern extends from the wooden frame, the singed markings evidence of where the sticks initially rested.

In ‘Acrylic Painting III (dancing figures)’(2013), a willfully thick use of acrylic medium creates two ghostly outlines, and the virtually translucent impasto blurs the figures in motion. Although Jensen draws from artists like the French Romantic 19th Century painter Théodore Chassériau or other classical masters, Peter Eleey notes in his essay ‘Regression Tourism’, Jensen ‘gives shape to a reconsideration of modernism’s utopias, now tempered by failure and corrupted by tragedy; he reminds us that those myths survive only as style.’ (2)”

someotherbooks:

Franz Erhard Walther (b. 1939 in Fulda, Germany), Großes Stoffbuch (Large Cloth Book (1969), on display at the Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin, as part of the exhibition “Body Pressure: Sculpture since the 1960s" (25 May 2013 - 12 January 2014).

The 68-page cloth book includes instructions for actions - such as those shown in the photos above - and when the work was first displayed viewers were allowed to play out the book’s directives, becoming parts of the sculpture themselves.

Saw this book in Berlin this summer, strongly felt they should make a reproduction for interaction.

(via thinkingimages)

"What is the source of our first suffering? It lies in the fact that we hesitated to speak… It was born in the moments when we accumulated silent things within us."

— Gaston Bachelard, Water and Dreams (via invisiblestories)

(via an-itinerant-poet)

cinoh:

Bahá’í Temple of South America 
(Hariri Pontarini Architects)

cinoh:

Bahá’í Temple of South America 

(Hariri Pontarini Architects)

(Source: youdidwhatnow)

j-sanders:




Jessica Sanders; 2013, beeswax on stretched linen, 56” x 50” 

j-sanders:

Jessica Sanders; 2013, beeswax on stretched linen, 56” x 50” 

(via julianminima)

breadquilt:

Jessica Sanders, 2013, beeswax and streched linen, 18” x 20” 

breadquilt:

Jessica Sanders, 2013, beeswax and streched linen, 18” x 20” 

(Source: j-sanders, via joydrurycox)

inexpressibleisland:

Detail from ‘Portrait of Fra ‘Luca Pacioli’. Mathematician. Jacopo Barbari 1495  Perspective, light and shadow of rhombicuboctahedron.

inexpressibleisland:

Detail from ‘Portrait of Fra ‘Luca Pacioli’. Mathematician. Jacopo Barbari 1495  Perspective, light and shadow of rhombicuboctahedron.

(via joydrurycox)

benoistj:

Caterina Fakes’s annotated copy of Ulysses
(via The Art of Writing in (e)Books — Editor’s Picks — Medium)

benoistj:

Caterina Fakes’s annotated copy of Ulysses

(via The Art of Writing in (e)Books — Editor’s Picks — Medium)

(via joydrurycox)